ACP has been shown to increase the quality of life of dying patients, improve the experience of family members, and decrease health care costs.

Under the leadership of the Canadian Hospice and Palliative Care Association (CHPCA), clinicians, researchers and decision makers have been meeting for the past 3 years to develop a national strategy to implement ACP in Canada, to raise the awareness of Canadians about the importance of advance care planning and to equip them with the tools they need to effectively engage in the process.

The following sites link to current Canadian research in advance care planning and end of life care:

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The ACCEPT Study is a Canadian, multi-year, multi-centre prospective audit of advance care planning practices in elderly patients at high risk of dying, and is seeking sites across Canada to join the study and our “Speak Up” campaign to implement advance care planning initiatives across Canada. Learn more>.

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Family Caregiver Coping in End of Life Cancer Care Centre on Aging, University of Victoria

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The i-GAP study a cross-Canada research project that is intended to increase the participation of patients and families in ACP in primary care settings

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Harris/Decima conducted for The Way Forward, a quantitative online research survey of 2,976 Canadian adults, What Canadians Say. This report includes knowledge of ACP and insights to the attitudes and perceptions about how to engage in discussions about goals of care/advance care planning. Survey data was also available by province.

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The Way Forward commissioned Ipsos Reid to conduct a research program with the main objective of exploring and defining how family/general physicians, nurses and other health professionals currently handle approaching palliative care with their patients.

The first quantitative phase research involved a survey among general practitioners/family physicians in Canada, as well as nurses/nurse practitioners in Canada working in primary care.  A second quantitative phase involved conducting a survey among oncologists in Ontario and Quebec, and nurses working in oncology in Ontario and Quebec who belong to the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO).